Poster
  • Location
    Melbourne
  • Status
    Complete
  • Type
    Residential
  • Size
    420sqm
  • Internal Area
    265sqm
  • Team
    Rob Kennon, Albert Chandra
  • Collaborators
    SK Projects, Eckersley Garden Architecture, Metro Building Surveying, Meyer Consulting
  • Film
    Derek Swalwell
  • Photographer
    Derek Swalwell
  • Tags
    Inner City, Housing, Heritage, Brick, Garden Setting, Insitu Concrete

This project is one in a series of walled garden projects and in many ways is considered as a prototype within our office.

Having worked on a number of inner-city, family-home renovations over the years we have developed (and continue to develop) a typological approach that attempts to deal with a similar set of conditions. Projects of this sort are almost always dealing with some form of heritage, the requirements of a family home and the conditions of a tight site. The obvious counterpart to a tight site is a small garden/outdoor area. Therefore, it is no surprise that our approach to these types of renovations is centred around the integration of a garden.

The entry sequence to House on a Lane starts by traversing through a textural, native garden - a more local and contemporary version of the neighbouring Victorian gardens that line the street. A larger, leafy, walled garden is situated towards the rear of the site and is the focal point of the renovation. Spaces within the new addition are oriented towards this garden which we designed in collaboration with Eckersley’s Garden Architecture. It comprises of a central fig tree, which was retained throughout construction, layered, tonal planting (as opposed to feature plants) as well as a pool and garage that are wrapped into the walled garden. The pool and garage are efficiently located at the rear of the garden to avoid taking area and attention away from the garden itself.

[1] The grey concrete and silhouette figure of the chimney appear as a section of negative space between the two red brick forms
[7] The existing part of the house was rebuilt to prolong it’s thermal life and fitted with bedrooms and study/living space
[2] A leafy, walled garden is situated towards the rear of the site and is the focal point of the renovation. It comprises of a central fig tree, which was retained throughout construction, layered, tonal planting and a pool and garage that are wrapped into the walled garden
[3] The inboard room (without windows) has been repurposed as a mudroom and bathroom, with ample storage and low-maintenance materials
The design relies on zoning and stepped levels to articulate the spaces within an open-plan arrangement. It understands the functional and pragmatic requirements of a family home and attempts to find a spot for everything
[4] The restrained material palette of concrete, timber and red brick coupled with an unfussy, simple form allows the building to recede into the background
[5] A laundry and storage room are located below ground in lieu of a side access on the site, and free up space on ground for more heavily utilized spaces
1/2
A limited material palette diverts attention away from the architecture and toward the home’s occupation, it’s garden and original heritage fabric
[8] The pool and garage are efficiently located at the rear of the garden to avoid taking area and attention away from the garden itself

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